Holiday

3 Ways to Promote Your Business Using the New Year's Holiday

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During the holidays, consumers have the spending spirit. Americans' holiday spending in November and December (excluding automobiles, gasoline and restaurants) has risen between 4.3 percent and 4.8 percent in 2017, for a total change of between $717.45 billion and $720.89 billion. The forecast, according to the National Retail Federation, compares with an average annual increase of 3.9 percent over the past 5 years.

To capitalize on the expected spending frenzy this holiday season, you should consider these three ways to promote your business during New Year's: 

1. Position products as "resolution solutions."

A new year means a fresh start. As a result, many Americans make resolutions as a way to improve their lives or reach new goals.

While up to 40 percent of Americans make resolutions, just 8 percent actually keep them, according to the Huffington Post. Why not help more people achieve their goals this year? Market your product as a tool that helps people keep their resolutions.

Your product or service might help people lose weight, improve time management, or limit stress. Think of ways your company can sell ''resolution solutions'' during the new year. 

2. Have a "fresh start" sale.

 As a new year rolls in, many people have an ''out with the old, in with the new'' mentality. You can capitalize on this concept by hosting a ''fresh start'' sale. Maybe you're looking to bring in new products and need to clear out some of your old inventory. New Year's is the perfect time to do it.

Promote your sale on social media, hang in-store banners, and create postcards you can add to shopping bags as a reminder.

3. Create content that helps people start new habits.

Since consumers are looking to learn something new or focus on improving certain habits, you can create content surrounding that idea while subtly promoting your product or service. 

Content marketing is big right now. It costs 62 percent less than traditional marketing and generates three times more leads.

A company selling cookware, for example, might offer online cooking classes to help people learn something new. An investment company might create an eBook that offers wise investment tips for the coming year.

By using these three promotional ideas, you'll start your new year strong. Even hosting an impromptu New Year's sale or an online flash sale promoted via email can give your company a financial boost heading into 2019. 

Here's How to Get Your Digital Marketing Holiday Ready

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Holiday season is upon us, and in digital marketing circles, it’s seen as the busiest and most competitive time of the year for marketers.  Now is the time to make sure all your planning and implementation strategies for holiday marketing are in sync and locked down.  

Here are some of the ways to make sure you're fully prepared for the 2018 holiday marketing season.   

Are You Using the 45-Day Rule Strategy?

If you've got content marketing as a key driver, then you need to know about the 45-day rule. Essentially, this rule states that an online business must look ahead and intentionally plan its web and social content 45 days ahead of important activities and promotions to drive user activity and search traffic. If you get your content posted later, it can hurt your overall search traffic. Adding your content two weeks before a significant event might result in only 25 to 50 percent of the traffic needed on your site. Think more long-term to 45 days, and you might achieve up to 90 percent of your intended traffic.  

Determine the Right Channels for Your Focus  

Choosing the right marketing channels for your product or service is something you've likely been thinking about for a while – make sure that you have determined the right course of action by reviewing and analyzing past performance and incorporating into your overall strategy. It starts with your product, its uses, its benefits, and how it impacts your target audience. Are you selling to consumers or businesses? How do you reach this target audience? On which channels are they receptive to your product?  

Create a Detailed Schedule of Campaign Activities

By now, your marketing team will have put together the range of your planned activities, including the timeline/schedule of promotions, in-store rollouts, online advertising campaigns, and other activities. This schedule must be detailed and exact. Your public relations team must be in sync with your product team, your customer success team, and other entities in the organization.

 

Developing Holiday-Specific Landing Pages

Your web development team should be offering frames for landing pages by early November. It should have already noted which year-round landing pages achieve high ROI so you can use that information as a jumping off point for your holiday landing pages. Some tips include:

●      Make sure your landing pages are optimized for mobile.

●      Make sure your page loading speed is high.

●      Use graphics to tell your story; make them high impact.

●      Use a strong, clear CTA; offer a premium to gain more attention.

●      Measure the journey of page visitors and follow up with retargeting efforts.  

Start to Build a Larger Retargeting Pool for November/December

The holiday season brings marketers a great opportunity to broaden reach and audience targets with retargeting. Your brand might be targeting a certain audience most of the year, but now you can retarget to others with a gift option. For instance, if you market golf clubs to mostly dedicated golfers for most of the year, you might be able to expand that with retargeted ad efforts to a broader audience that may include non-golfers who are comparison shopping for the golfer in their life.

Even though your company is putting its efforts into holiday season selling, remember that customers will look to your product or service during the following year too. So make that important first impression count.

Don't be afraid to increase your frequency of emails or social posts about special holiday sales during these weeks. By now, most customers are more engaged with your promotions and might actually be looking for your promotions.  

Lastly, track your results, define your success measurements, and keep a log of how your efforts are working for this year in order to replicate the same for next year or switch the offerings.

Leverage Google Shopping to Drive Holiday Results

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Ask anyone how Google Shopping has performed in 2018, and you're likely to hear how it is dominating the retail search marketing arena. Combining Google shopping with your current digital strategy can only enhance performance in sales. With consumers spending over $19.6 billion online during the five-day period from Thanksgiving to Cyber Monday in 2017, now is the time to prepare your campaign strategy for this year’s shopping season. 

How can you leverage Google Shopping? Check out a few tips to increase efficiency, gain user engagement, and boost conversions on your Google Shopping holiday campaigns.

Set Your Budget and Key Performance Indicators Early

Before doing anything else, Google recommends reviewing historic holiday campaigns and evaluating campaign performance and necessary budget adjustments. Note any days where your click share decreased but retail query volume increased, and budget more for those days to avoid missing potential customers. Flexibility in budgeting can help your campaign survive the fluctuations in holiday shopping.

Prep Your Feed

It also helps to take some time before heading into the holiday shopping season to make sure your product feeds are looking good. Get those product photos on point, upload promotions, and fill out product attributes with as much information as possible to minimize disapprovals from the outset. Also, enable Content API, automated item updates, and automated feed deliver to keep your product pricing and availability fresh.

Plan Promotions

Holiday shoppers love getting good deals, and many shoppers are swayed to make purchases based on the promotions available. Make use of merchant promotions to highlight your special offers and to schedule price changes ahead of time. Giving shoppers plenty of special deals during the holidays can boost the amount of clicks you get and ultimately drive your conversion rate.

Don't Overlook the Omnichannel Approach

Mobile remains king when it comes to retail at any time of year. In fact, Google tells its users to "double down on mobile shopping" because of the importance of maintaining visibility on mobile devices. We think it's critical to create a seamless experience over multiple platforms. After all, omnichannel marketing using innovative tools such Adtaxi's Quantum is essential for giving consumers the experience they expect and maximizing performance during the holiday shopping season and beyond.

6 Ways Advertisers Can Prepare for the 2018 Holiday Season

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The winter holidays will be here before you know it. That means it's not too early for advertisers to get their holiday campaign planning started.

1. Perfect Your Holiday Strategy

Developing a campaign strategy means determining the best way to promote your brand through the holiday season. Much of the focus is usually on the big holiday shopping days that fall just after Thanksgiving in late November: Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

Thanksgiving, Christmas, Hanukkah, and New Year's Eve can also be vital to advertising success, as each holiday has its own competitive advantage. Once you determine which holiday(s) are ideal for your advertising campaign, it's easier to put your plan into motion.

2. Create Holiday-themed Promotions

Talking to others gets your creative juices flowing so you can prepare holiday-themed promotions that can be implemented when the time comes.

One effective promotion may be offers centered around your campaign theme, such as discounts on some of your bestselling items. Offers can also come in the form of content specifically created for holiday use. For example, gift guides give shoppers inspiration. A few ideas include:

●      $15 holiday treats for coffee enthusiasts

●      5 gifts Mom/Dad will love for $50 or less

●      3 must-have gifts for kids for $25 or less

3. Look at Other Sales Opportunities

Not every holiday campaign is exclusive to Christmas. There are other shopping days tied to the holidays that deserve promotional attention, too.

Small Business Saturday is the day after Black Friday and two days after Thanksgiving. On this day, people are encouraged to show support for local businesses in their area. This is a prime opportunity for advertisers to offer shoppers big deals. According to a survey from American Express, which promotes Small Business Saturday, and the National Federation of Independent Business, 108 million shoppers spent $12.9 billion on Small Business Saturday in November 2017.

Another promotional opportunity for online retailers is Green Monday, which falls on the second Monday of December.  Back in 2007, eBay noticed that was one of its best days for online sales, so a "holiday" was born.

Finally, there's Free Shipping Day, an annual one-day event held in mid-December and targeted towards procrastinating shoppers who have to get their presents shipped quickly. This promotional holiday provides consumers with a way to buy a lot and save big on shipping charges, with a guaranteed delivery by Christmas Eve.

4. Prepare a Marketing Calendar

With every marketing plan comes countless hours of research, refinement of tactics, creating a message, and cost analysis. What's next? A marketing calendar. A blueprint for the campaign launch process, a marketing calendar guides each stage, from initial planning to the precise time to increase online ad spending.

One thing you can do in advance is run organic campaigns on a platform such as Facebook Ads. Starting now gives you a head start to evaluate your audience to see what's trending, the content they're responding to, and the offers you think might be of interest to them.

When it comes to Facebook Ads, monitor ad performance regularly and make sure to follow Facebook's troubleshooting guide if there are problems. If your ads aren't getting results from consumers, you'll want to have time to rebound. But remember, according to a 2016 survey, 40 percent of U.S. consumers start their holiday shopping by Halloween.

5. Deploy a Social Media Strategy

Once you have your plan in place, it's time to get active on social media to get in front of the right audience before the winter holidays. Your marketing calendar comes back into play here. Think about what types of content you need to produce during the holiday season. Should you provide blog posts? eBooks? Be selective in your focus, because overwhelming your audience with holiday-related advertising to get them in the shopping mood doesn't cut it.

Your audience is likely to gravitate towards content that makes a difference in how they live or helps them narrow their holiday wish list. Engage with your audience and find out what it wants.

Get people talking, sharing, liking, and eventually buying. Have some fun. Ask your audience to share memorable moments with photos and the stories that go along with them. Branded hashtags for use on Instagram or Twitter keeps the conversation going.

Choose content guaranteed to solicit positive responses and then schedule publications for November through December. Don't forget to monitor all social media accounts, as performance is paramount to campaign success. Also, social monitoring helps track keywords to better respond to those commonly used during the holidays.

6. Review Previous Performances

Analyze which campaigns worked well in past years and determine what made them work. Like life itself, marketing trends change. You may have to dig through archives of data to find out which campaigns worked, which didn't, and which platforms affected visibility and reach.

Review past reports and use social media marketing tools and analytics to make prudent budgeting decisions. This will help to determine where your resources are best used for the upcoming holiday season.

Successful holiday campaigns are all about preparation. Be clear about what you want to offer and use the right approach to draw shoppers online and into your stores.

A Job Well Done: 5 Interesting Facts About Labor Day

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We celebrate it every year on the first Monday in September — barbecues, last-minute vacations, and a farewell to summer are common themes among Americans celebrating Labor Day.

At Adtaxi, we believe people matter just as much as technology. We even made that part of our mission statement. That's why we want to honor the people behind this national holiday and the blood, sweat, and tears they poured into their work so we could all enjoy what we have today. It's more than just an excuse for a weekend getaway or a blowout barbecue. Check out these five fascinating facts about Labor Day's little-known backstory.

The Labor Movement Started Way Before Labor Day

During the earliest days in America, workers suffered in terrible conditions. There was no minimum wage law. Workers were lucky to make enough to put food on the table. Long hours and dangerous, dirty conditions were the norm. Kids as young as five years old would work in factories and mines to help feed their families. The labor movement really kicked off with a strike that took place in 1768 in protest of wage reductions to New York journeymen tailors.

Labor Day (Probably) Didn't Start in the U.S.

Like anything else, there's disagreement about who came up with the idea of Labor Day. But one thing's certain: Canada beat the U.S. by about a decade. The first Canadian Labor Day was held in Toronto in 1872 as a demonstration demanding workers' rights. The idea quickly became popular, and the first Labor Day demonstration in the United States was in 1882.

The First Labor Day Was a Parade (and a Protest)

The idea to create a movement to honor workers started gaining popularity in the early 1880s and the first Labor Day in the U.S. was planned by the Central Labor Union and held in New York City on September 5, 1882. Roughly 10,000 workers chose to take unpaid leave to participate in a parade from City Hall to Wendel's Elm Park at West 92nd Street and what is now Columbus Ave. The event culminated in a concert and speeches in the park, all part of the workers' protest demanding the end of backbreaking 12-hour days, seven-day work weeks, and a lack of basic rights and protections.

Oregon Was the First State to Make it a Holiday

What we now know as a holiday wasn't always a holiday. That first labor protest parade inspired other regions to start holding their own parades. Oregon was the first state to declare "Labor Day" a holiday in 1887. Congress passed an act making it a legal holiday in every state and the District of Columbia on June 28, 1894. That's also when it was established as the first Monday in September every year.

It's a Real Celebration

What started as a movement to improve conditions and celebrate American working people evolved into more than just a parade. We still celebrate the achievements and contributions of everyone in the U.S workforce, but Labor Day also marks the unofficial end of summer. That's also where the fashion rule "no white after Labor Day" started. The rich population in the Victorian era would return from their summer vacations and store their white summer clothing for the next year in preparation for returning to work and school.

Labor Day is among the biggest shopping days of the year. It's a big day for businesses of all kinds, but it also has some fascinating history behind it. Whether you celebrate with a big backyard bash, heading out of town or going to a parade, send off summer in style.