SEM

Maximize Your Ad Dollars and Minimize Your Vacancy

Vacant properties are a stress on time and money and the quicker they are filled, the sooner they become profitable. In order to reduce the gap between qualified tenants, you must have a strategic marketing plan in place. However, navigating digital marketing can seem complicated and overwhelming without the proper tools. With so many available options, how do you evaluate and implement a strategy to hit budgeted occupancy efficiently?

It starts by taking a proactive approach to get in front of prospective renters before their search begins and helping them through the journey.

Watch our webinar to learn the steps to maximize your property ad dollars and attract quality traffic.

8 Ways Bing is Important for Search

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Google may be the dominant search engine, but for advertisers looking to reach diverse audiences, there's more to search than Google alone. Microsoft's Bing search engine offers advertisers alternative options that might be right for them. In this article, we'll discuss some key differences between Bing and Google and outline the importance of these differences.

Growth for Bing

In Microsoft's fourth quarter, the company reported Bing's revenue rose 17 percent over the past year. Even though it's still dwarfed by Google, which owns nearly 75 percent of the search engine market, Bing holds a respectable third slot (after Baidu) with nearly 8 percent of search engine market share, according to NetMarketShare.

But Bing makes up for its smaller size in different ways. These are the kinds of things marketers should keep in mind when drawing up a well-rounded search strategy:

  1. Demographic differences: According to 2016 research from GML Consulting, Bing users tend to be older, wealthier, and well educated. For marketers looking for an affluent audience, likely connected to the Microsoft online universe already, Bing can be an effective tool.

  2. Search results: According to Search Engine Land, Bing uses an enriched basic search that goes further than typical search results. When you search for "movies," for example, Bing shows users movie options for streaming outlets such as Amazon and Netflix, as well as what movies are playing in cinemas near you. This asset shows increased thinking in Bing's search makeup.

  3. Easier purchase links: Bing tends to display "real-world context" results that allow consumers to buy goods and services more easily, while Google tends to offer results for consumers to learn more before making a purchase.

  4. Unique query searches: Unique query searches are high on Bing, meaning they're only displayed and found on Bing and users searching for them have a high intent to buy.

  5. Most relevant entity: Advertisers can use Bing Entity Search API to identify the entity with the most relevance based on the search terms used. This can be used to see the multiple entity types while searching for favorite local businesses, video games, books, and movies.

  6. Working with Bing Ads: Bing Ads is less costly on cost-per-clicks than Google's AdWords. There's also less competition on popular keywords, which can lead to better ad positioning and improved click-through rates.

  7. Bing for Business: By increasing its deep discovery tools in a more robust knowledge graph, Bing's Places for Business allows businesses to place more emphasis on its website's published content and data. This is another alternative to promoting a company's brand for online and offline consumers.

  8. Negative keywords: In Bing Ads, negative keywords don't negate targeted keywords. This is an important feature for advertisers who don't want their ads being shown when a search query contains a bid-on keyword but is irrelevant to the advertiser's business content and landing page copy.

The recent uptick in Bing's business shows its product improvements are working well for brands that use it. It keeps the competitive search engine market companies in deep discovery mode for adding new search methods, and means Bing's improvements are helping to optimize campaigns for business marketers.

Google's Mobile Indexing and What It Means for Your Business 

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Is your company's mobile website being easily found by potential customers on their devices? If not, it's time to make some big changes because Google is now ranking business websites based on the mobile version rather than the desktop site.

Google announced this "mobile-first" change in late March. Mobile-first means its Googlebot will crawl your company's mobile site first for search engine optimization (SEO) indexing and ranking. Historically, Google has used the desktop version of your website's content for its crawling, indexing, and ranking practices.

Why the change? Not every company is using responsive web design for its mobile site, and, according to Google, that was causing issues for mobile searchers. So Google is switching to mobile-first content gathering, and recommending to site owners to make their content mobile-friendly as fast as they can.

Remember, this is mobile-first, not mobile-only. Google will still index your desktop site content, but keep in mind you're likely to lose out against more mobile-savvy competitors. Google's change is a reflection of the immense growth of the mobile web. It's estimated there are now some 10 billion mobile-connected devices in use around the world, which is leading to big growth in the ecommerce industry. 

Let's take a look at what Google's mobile-first indexing means for your content, and what steps you need to take to stay on top of SEO development.

Understanding Mobile-First

Having mobile-friendly and fast-loading content can help your mobile search results perform better. Typically, search rankings are affected by your site's load times, mobile-friendliness factors, relevant content, low-quality visuals, and proper meta tags, among other factors. If you gain site visitors from ads you've placed, do you want those mobile visitors to visit a site that loads slowly, enables pop-ups, and isn't overly optimized for mobile? Of course not! That's why your site needs to speed up its mobile capabilities.

One way to check how well your site is performing in mobile is through Google's Search Console service. If your site is already optimized for mobile, you likely have been notified via Search Console that mobile-first indexing is enabled for your site.

How Your Site May Be Affected by Mobile-First Indexing

Your site might be affected by this indexing move to mobile-first if you haven't made the necessary changes to your site's design. Here are some of the possible ways:

●      You maintain a separate mobile site (or sites) for your company. Does your company still use highly optimized, separate mobile sites? If so, you'll need to revamp this into a unified responsive design because the content, structured data, and meta data needs will all change.

●      You do not have a mobile site yet. If this is the case, why not? It's time to hire a website designer to get your site mobile-friendly, because that's where you'll find more potential sales. If you're unsure of what to do, use this free Google tool to check your site's mobile-friendliness factor. 

What It Means for Advertisers

Advertisers should pay close attention to becoming mobile-first. If you're offering a poor mobile user experience, you'll lose conversions and your bounce rates will soar. That could lead to a much lower pay-per-click (PPC) ad quality score, and higher cost per click (CPC). Ad budgets will shrink. Over time, all of these costs will accumulate, leading to higher costs per acquisition. That has a serious impact on leads and sales, and can put your business out of business.

So it's time to make changes. Try testing Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) for your site. This will help your site's indexing. Also, try using AMP ads. They load faster, and can lead to a better user experience and higher click-through rates for advertisers. Getting a more responsive design for your site will help you join the mobile revolution.

Boosting SEM Performance by Leveraging Remarketing    

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Remarketing has been used by online advertisers to great effect in recent years as part of their overall SEM strategy. These ‘reminder ads’ have proven to be an ideal way for advertisers to reconnect with consumers and site visitors, to spur them to have a look at an advertiser’s product or service. Remarketing ads remind website visitors to remember your brand after their initial visit to your site. These efforts can sometimes yield the best results from an SEM campaign. It’s an effective way for advertisers to once again reach out to a user who’s either searched for your products or already visited your site.

Remarketing + Paid Search

Using remarketing along with a paid search campaign can benefit advertisers’ in several ways:

  • Boost brand awareness:remarketing helps to establish your brand as an authoritative voice for the product or service, and can eventually lead the viewer to click to your site for a conversion.
  • Increase data insights:Remarketing can help your business refocus its marketing tactics. The data from a combined SEM/Remarketing campaign can yield insights about what landing pages consumers are coming to, or why consumers are leaving your purchase page, or some other fact.
  • Higher View-throughs:Consumers who get remarketing ads might use that reminder and go straight to your site for a conversion. No PPC payment for the advertiser.

Measuring Remarketing

Advertisers must measure their remarketing efforts as part of a paid search SEM campaign. Measurement will help advertisers know if the campaign is meetings its goals. Here are some of the key metrics for measuring:

ROI: Is you remarketing meeting its overall costs? Are you making a gain from your investment? Or spending over your investment without a return?

CTR: Check your click-through rate, which is how often your ad was clicked.

CPC: This is your cost per click. Divide the campaign dollar spend and divide by the number of clicks.

Conversions: How many conversions are you getting from your click-throughs? Are you able to show a positive ROI on your campaign?

Here are other consideration to keep in mind for remarketing with a paid search campaign:

  • Use RSLAs (Remarketing Lists for Search Ads)Advertisers can create RSLAs based on site visitors who have visited their website or app, and how many pages were viewed. Having this information can impact the ad spending and overall conversion rates.
  • Categorize site visitors - Focus in on users’ online behavior, audience type, and location. Having more details can help work the content of your targeted ads.
  • Make the call to action clear in your remarketing - guiding consumers to make a conversion will help increase the performance of your remarketing efforts.
  • Experiment with different sizes- you’ll be able to see how different sizes, pictures and text copy of remarketing ads can work with different users.
  • Limit your remarketing- Too many SEM campaigns for remarketing overdo the amount of ad impressions in a campaign. It’s best to limit ad impressions to five or fewer attempts at ‘reminding’.